Posts filed under ‘Sex Ed’

Sex Ed: Guess and Check

ARE there more teen pregnancies now than ever before? Are “kids these days…” more out of control, engaging in more risk behaviors and more likely to get pregnant in their teen years? Students start by guessing the answers to some key questions about sex – here’s the class sheet I used.

And then we discuss the way they will find out answers to their guesses using reliable, evidence-based, scientific sources that I provide for them. This is not a time to look stuff up on Google by themselves with these loaded questions. And searching for ‘teen sex’ is likely to come up with all kinds of inappropriate sites. Here is the link to today’s lesson plan which includes the links to reliable resources.

We talk briefly about scanning through charts and graphs looking for surprises – stuff that contradicts their guesses and anything else that startles them. That’s exactly what investigative journalists do – comb through boring-looking reports looking for the headline. In this case, it turns out that the headline “Today’s teens more responsible than you were!” would work. The trends with teen sexuality are by and large good news, well except when compared with other developed countries. That surprise leads to a short discussion of discrimination experienced even by the very privileged teens in my classes, just for being teens. FullSizeRender 19

For controversial topics like sex education, it’s extra important to use reliable sources and avoid fake news. This dull, dull topic is also re-vitalized when considered in the context of using science to figure out why the birth rate among teens has dropped, and why it is higher in some parts of the country compared to others. If we could figure out what is making the difference, effective policy could save lives and help teens launch into their adult lives without unwanted pregnancies.

This is just one piece of our sex education curriculum that we’ve developed. If you want the lesson plans with links, go to my school loop website. Sex ed started on March 9th, 2017.

After teaching this for about 33 years, I thought you might like a little list of tips that have helped me:

  • Talk over your sex ed curriculum with your administration ahead of time. You’ll need their support and backing. Sex ed stuff is the most likely part of the curriculum to get you into trouble with parents so front loading is extra important.
  • Try to teach similar stuff as your grade level colleague.
  • Share what will be taught at your grade level with parents in a neutral way – we have a folder of resources we use on Google Drive and shared the link with an e mail to parents from the principal. Parents can opt out.
  • Don’t try to persuade parents who want to opt their child out. Provide work from a text book so you don’t have to design an alternative curriculum.
  • Be clear that you are teaching information and not values. That’s up to families.
  • Frequently encourage students to talk to their parents about sex etc.- parent/child open talk about sex is the single most important factor in reducing risk behavior in teens.
  • Circulate a lot during activities, table discussions and while students are watching clips on their iPads etc. That’s when they might actually ask you a private, needed question. Many fewer parents that we think talk to their children openly about sex and yet we are in a culture saturated with it. They need a trusted, friendly and informed adult to talk to.
  • We teach our own sex ed and don’t outsource it to experts who will not have the depth of relationships that we do with our students.
  • Never, ever say “in my experience…”. Duh 🙂 And don’t share anything about your own private life.
  • Have a question box but don’t answer crazy stuff about unicorns (“If a man gets an erection on his head, is he a unicorn.” Yes. Really.), and unserious questions that are designed to disgust or embarrass you. Also questions that are inherently racist, misogynistic etc. You are the teacher. Don’t be bullied by naughty boys (mostly) intent on a laugh.
  • Re-phrase questions about your own sex life if the question seems serious. Re-phrase badly written questions that may have a serious point underlying them.
  • Model being matter of fact.
  • Talk about sex as an important part of life and a natural drive within the context of passing genes on to the next generation.
  • Scare tactics backfire. Being embarrassed is hard to avoid at first but the more relaxed you can be, the better you convey that sex is a normal part of life.
  • Give students time to practice talking about sex in mixed gender groups. It’s an important skill.
  • Embarrassment about ‘privates’ kills – my poor grandfather did not talk about changes in his bowel movements until his colon cancer was very advanced and it nearly did kill him. You might have similar stories in your family.
  • Re-phrase questions and answers in the third person. This avoids “You will find that…. ” which could seriously embarrass a student you might be glancing at accidentally. Generalizing “Many people find that…. ” is a safer way to phrase answers.
  • Some of the questions in the question box suggest that my 7th graders are viewing porn – how do we address this? This is a serious question that I don’t yet have a good answer for. It’s so easy for students to see it – if not at a parents house, then at a friends house or on a friend’s phone. Porn consumption is having a real effect on adult relationships. What is it doing to our children?  Our school community will need to engage with this question and soon.

 

March 16, 2017 at 1:41 PM Leave a comment

A Whole year of 7th Grade Science – the best one yet!

A link to the whole lot – a year’s worth of successful, fun and free curriculum tested at Orinda Intermediate School.

Continue Reading June 11, 2015 at 2:12 PM Leave a comment

HIV/AIDS – setting the scene

Mystery storytelling set-up for teaching HIV/AIDS plus links and a ppt presentation.

Continue Reading April 15, 2015 at 4:31 PM Leave a comment

Reduce the Risk of Teens Dying Young!

Motivate students to use CDC mortality statistics and other credible sources to analyze causes of teen deaths, and come up with effective solutions.

Continue Reading April 8, 2015 at 3:56 PM Leave a comment

“I can’t believe I’m HIV positive!”

With a real-world scenario, students learn why good internet research can be a life-or-death skill.

Continue Reading March 23, 2010 at 2:34 PM Leave a comment

Sex ed contd: questions and misconceptions

Misconceptions of conception, lots of kids know less about sex than they think!

Continue Reading March 16, 2010 at 7:29 PM Leave a comment

Stories in vital statistics about sex!

Using national and local survey data to interest kids in sex! And as a way to discuss data bias and survey design.

Continue Reading March 12, 2010 at 11:10 AM Leave a comment


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