Energy Opportunity Finale: The “Marketplace” Game!

June 23, 2013 at 12:37 PM Leave a comment

THIS was a great end to the project, linking the fun of shopping, with the big picture of how voters and consumers make choices for issues like energy opportunities. This third year out, went so much more easily and resulted in an amazingly high level discussion around the effects of money on public opinion. The biggest surprises are the income disparity, the effect of money on which ideas are most popular, and the overwhelming effect of social connections over anything else such as the quality of the EOP and the poster design. Just like in real life perhaps…

This game could be adapted for many kinds of issue-oriented projects from 5th grade through college, and includes common core standards for math and ELA.

The Nuts and Bolts:

This sheet has the rationale and intro for the student activity.12. The Marketplace Game

The EOP ad campaign multi medias were screened just before this activity. Here’s the guidelines and rubric for that. 11. Ad Campaign and rubric

The poster part of the ad campaign were submitted and graded according to the rubric in the 11. Ad Campaign and rubric, based on their research done with this outline:.10. EOP Research paper

Prep/Set Up:

The classroom was set up with a semi circle of chairs and a semi circle of desks behind them.

Chairs in semi circle, desks in semi circle, posters, plates and legislator addresses.

Class set up: Chairs in semi circle, desks in semi circle, posters, plates and legislator addresses.

Posters were distributed on the desks, each with a plate for pennies and vote beads. I set up a list of elected representatives to write to, 13b. Addresses for postcards and post cards at each table. I had winner ‘ribbons’ for most votes, most money donated and most post cards written, and $10 worth of pennies from the bank.

Legislator list, cards and ways posters were set out.

Legislator list, cards and ways posters were set out.

The Lesson:

1. Give students their income percentile as they come into class – bottom 5%, 10% etc. then start again when you get to 95%.

2. Have them use the income distribution graph from the US Census bureau. I demo-ed one reading, highlighting the logarithmic scale.

US Income Distribution based on US Census Bureau 2012. Note log scale.

US Income Distribution based on US Census Bureau 2012. Note log scale.

3. Students showed me their work before I counted out their pennies. Suggest you have a scale, or helper to make it a bit quicker.

4. Distribute one vote bead or poker chip per student.

5. Introduce the activity quickly, then let students go ‘shopping’ for the energy opportunities they like best. Observe the social interactions – it’s a microcosm of real world political and economic reality.

Rich man, poor man...

Rich man, poor man…

Sucking up to the money bags guy...

Sucking up to the money bags guy…

The Follow Up:

Post the winners of each category at the front of the room with the ribbons on them. Let them wander around and think about why the winners won.

Kids answers to the following questions:

“What made the winners (votes, $, post cards) the winners?”

Examining the winning posters.

Examining the winning posters.

“How was this realistic or not realistic?”

“What are the 3 most important energy opportunities

The energy peace pie chart

The energy peace pie chart

for the future?”

Examining the winning posters.

Sharing analysis question ideas.

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Entry filed under: Class Management, Critical Thinking, Data Analysis, End of Year Activities, Energy Opportunities Project, Environmental Education, Inquiry and critical thinking, Project Based Learning, PROJECTS, TAP Curriculum, Uncategorized. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , .

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